We Are Enrolled Agents

Enrolled Agents (EAs) are the only federally licensed tax practitioners who specialize in taxation covering individuals and businesses and also have unlimited rights to represent taxpayers before the IRS. This means they are unrestricted as to which taxpayers they can represent and what types of tax matters they can handle. Enrolled Agent status is the highest credential the IRS awards. In addition to the stringent testing and application process, the IRS requires Enrolled Agents to complete 72 hours of continuing education every three years.

How does one become an Enrolled Agent?

The license is earned in one of two ways, by passing a comprehensive examination which covers all aspects of the tax code, or having worked at the IRS for five years in a position which regularly interpreted and applied the tax code and its regulations. All candidates are subjected to a rigorous background check conducted by the IRS.

How can an Enrolled Agent help me?

Enrolled Agents advise, represent, and prepare tax returns for individuals, partnerships, corporations, estates, trusts, and any entities with tax-reporting requirements. Only Enrolled Agents are required to demonstrate to the IRS their competence in all areas of taxation, representation and ethics before they are given unlimited representation rights before the IRS. Unlike attorneys and CPAs, who are state licensed and who may or may not choose to specialize in taxes, all Enrolled Agents specialize in taxation. An Enrolled Agent's expertise in the continually changing field of taxation can ensure your tax preparation will reflect the most up-to-date tax laws and requirements.

Privilege and the Enrolled Agent:

The IRS Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998 allows federally authorized practitioners (those bound by the Department of Treasury's Circular 230 regulations) a limited client privilege. This privilege allows confidentiality between the taxpayer and the Enrolled Agent under certain conditions. The privilege applies to situations in which the taxpayer is being represented in cases involving audits and collection matters. It is not applicable to the preparation and filing of a tax return. This privilege does not apply to state tax matters, although a number of states have an accountant-client privilege.

Are Enrolled Agents bound by any ethical standards?

Enrolled Agents are required to abide by the provisions of the Department of Treasury's Circular 230, which provides the regulations governing the practice of Enrolled Agents before the IRS.

IRS.gov Enrolled Agents Info